The Thinking 
Housewife
 

Did Feminists Discover Sex?

January 25, 2010

 

ftsleep 

One of the great conceits of feminists is that they introduced female sexual pleasure to the world. Before the sex experts of the 1970s, human beings were entirely in the dark about female anatomy and the nature of womanly pleasure.

Feminists must maintain their claim over this discovery. It’s a subtle form of blackmail. Women are told they cannot possibly enjoy sex unless traditional sex roles are overturned. The truth of course is that feminists did not discover female sexuality. The claim that they did violates both common sense and historical fact. In the long dark nights that characterized the ages before electricity, much was known. It is inconceivable that women were too stupid for many thousands of years to communicate to the men with whom they spent the greater portion of their lives, and that the majority of men were indifferent to them.

Feminists maintain the Victorians lived in total ignorance, with women consigned to frigidity or frustration. In fact, physicians were publicly candid about female sexuality in the nineteenth century, including Dr. Charles Knowlton, who wrote of the female sexual organ, as is recounted in Linda Lichter’s excellent book, Simple Social Graces.  In the 1970s, the historian Carl Degler uncovered a sexual survey of married women born between 1850 and 1880. Most of the middle-class women surveyed reported that they typically experienced “voluptuous spasms” while in bed with their husbands.

                                                         — Comments —

Lisa writes:

When Queen Victoria sent her newly married seventeen-year-old girl off with Prince Frederick of Prussia, she was uneasy that she had never discussed marital intimacy with her daughter. She just told her, “Frederick is a good, kind man,” to trust him and do as he told her on the night of the wedding. She did not see her daughter for some weeks or months, and was eager to have a moment alone to talk with the new bride. Her daughter, sensing what her mother wanted to discuss, smiled at her and said something to the effects of, “Mother, when something is so right and wonderful, what is there to be worried about?”

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