The Thinking 
Housewife
 
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While Housewives are Desperate Deadbeats, People Who Have Jobs Are Always Doing Important Things

April 16, 2011

 

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What Is This Site Worth to You?

April 16, 2011

 

Cordelia Comforting King Lear in Prison, George William Joy (1886)

Cordelia Comforting King Lear in Prison, George William Joy (1886)

THIS website is a labor of love, with pennies of profit for each hour that goes into it. I want to be able to continue to serve this community — and that’s what it is in the best sense of the word, a scattered community of individuals with a spirit of inquiry and an appreciation for the common good.

To continue, I need your help. So, please, let me know what this site is worth to you by donating, be it a dime or a dollar a day, or a dime or dollar every time you find something worthwhile, or whatever you think you could spare to keep the site alive.

With your help, I will be able to continue to do my part. Thank you to all those who have given.

 

April 16, 2011

The Wide, Wide World, Frank Holl (1873)

The Wide, Wide World, Frank Holl (1873)

 

A Good Friday Tragedy

April 16, 2011

 

GOOD FRIDAY is normally a dark, grief-stricken day. In my family history, one Good Friday stands out as sadder than all others.

I had a great aunt, Ann, who was completely deaf from early childhood. She was in her early twenties. After having attended college for a year, Ann was resigned to living at home with her widowed mother. She helped my great grandmother care for her elderly father, known by my mother as Grandfather Rafferty.

Grandfather Rafferty had a long white beard. On the afternoon of Good Friday 78 years ago, he was in the parlor smoking his pipe and Ann was upstairs. No one else was at home. Grandfather Rafferty fell asleep in his chair with the pipe still in his mouth. His beard caught fire. He presumably called for help but Ann could not hear him. He died the next day. Read More »

 

French Potatoes

April 16, 2011

 

HERE IS  the recipe for another dish in my Easter menu. It is what I call Gruyére Potatoes, but is otherwise known by the French as Gratin Dauphinois. It is taken from Patricia Wells’ excellent French cookbook Bistro Cooking.  I have made this many times, and everyone – children and adults – has liked it, except for one person who categorically rejected potatoes.

Generously salt the milk and water in which you cook the potatoes. I prefer Yukon Gold potatoes in this recipe because they do not fall apart. Read More »

 
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