The Thinking 
Housewife
 

April 19, 2011

 

The Metamorphosis of Daphne into a Laurel Tree, Charles Sims

The Metamorphosis of Daphne into a Laurel Tree, Charles Sims

 

Strawberry Devonshire Pie

April 19, 2011

 

HERE is the recipe for Strawberry Devonshire Pie that I promised as part of my suggested Easter menu. It is easy to make though I recommend making the crust from scratch yourself. I’m not a fan of those gargantuan shipped strawberries, but even they work well in this recipe. This is a refreshing contrast to Easter lamb and is another recipe from a family cookbook compiled by my mother, who incidentally was one of the first female computer programmers in America and worked on computer calculations for the hydrogen bomb before becoming a housewife and raising seven children.

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A New Breed of Female Delinquents

April 19, 2011

 

THE obliteration of childhood has brought dramatic increases in juvenile crime. That especially includes crime among girls, which more than doubled between 1985 and 2007, exceeding the rate of inceases for male crime. Fatherless America, the land of institutionalized matriarchy and casual neglect of the young, is producing hardened and violent girls. This 16-year-old and her friend are charged in Illinois with handcuffing and sexually molesting a 17-year-old mentally retarded boy. This is the face of a girl whose innocence died centuries ago.

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Two Kinds of Love

April 19, 2011

 

WRITING in response to this post about a woman’s disappointment with her husband, Jeff W. writes:

There are two kinds of love: human love and God’s love. Sometimes these two kinds of love are called by the ancient Greek terms eros and agape.

Eros and agape are very different. One main difference is that eros recognizes value in its object and loves it, while agape loves and then creates value in its object. In other words, eros recognizes an alpha male and loves him because he makes her feel safe, protected, and feminine. Agape, however, can love any person, even the most loathsome and disgusting. This is the kind of love a Christian may have for a diseased and dying beggar from the streets of Calcutta, or even (though it may seem unbelievable) a beta male husband. Through agape love, a loathed and rejected person becomes the beloved.

There is a good summary of the qualities of these two kinds of love on page 159 of this book (scroll to the bottom). Read More »