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Porn and “Intellectual” Freedom

 

IN RESPONSE to complaints by Seattle area parents that their children are being exposed to hard core porn when they walk by library computers,  Barbara Jones, director of the American Library Association’s intellectual freedom office, said last week, “Sometimes, in a library, you’re going to see information that’s going to make you uncomfortable.”

The freedom of an adult to do anything he desires is more important to our morally-stupefied elites than the freedom of a child to visit a public library and return home with his innocence intact.

According to the Seattle Post Intelligencer, one mother’s ten-year-old daughter was reduced to tears and unable to sleep after viewing violent sex while walking past a library computer in use by an adult patron. The woman was told by a librarian “the library is a public space; it’s more like a bus stop than a safe haven.”

                                                                 — Comments —

Mary writes:

The bus stop analogy succeeds and fails at the same time. The implication that one would possibly encounter an exhibitionist in a bus stop is correct. But any good cop would protect the victim in no uncertain terms from the pervert and hustle him along or even arrest him; apparently the librarians supporting this disgusting behavior have no such healthy and protective inclinations toward their patrons. 

So I thank that woman for labelling those who view porn in public as exhibitionists, because I think it goes to the heart of the matter. Pornography is so easily available that no one has to view it in public – unless they wish to. Exhibitionism is a perversion that is still not tolerated, even in this ever more libertine society of ours. It could even be considered a sexual act, as it leads to gratification for the exhibitionist. I can’t help but assume that these men are in a state of arousal responding to the material they’re viewing, and are gaining even more gratification from the fact that they are in a public place with people walking by. This is totally and completely unacceptable by any standard. 

I’m not sure it helps to tackle this from the perspective of protecting only children. First of all, they can be sequestered too easily, “solving” the problem on the surface; and secondly, it harms everyone, not just chidren, from young men and woman who have recently reached adulthood, to me, to my 80 year old mother (yes, she had this experience, and also had trouble ridding herself from the images). If it’s just about children, they can easily say it’s the parents responsibility to protect their children, keep them in the children’s section. Hey, wait a minute: I thought it took a village to raise a child! Some village. 

We need to shout from the mountaintops: public viewing of pornography anywhere is unacceptable. It’s taking part in two perversions – first, the perversion of exhibitionism which is forbidden by law; and secondly, the perversion of voyeurism (today known simply as “viewing pornography”), which is no longer forbidden by law. But let’s get these guys on the first charge. They would be hustled out of any bus stop – let’s hustle them out of our libraries.

Laura writes:

Yes, it is a form of exhibitionism and should be treated in the same way as is public masturbation.

Kendra writes:

I am furious after reading this!

I have experienced problems with porn use at my local library in Indiana too. We used to visit at least every other day, but no more. Even though I pay my taxes, I have stopped using the library, and instead, reserve materials online and pick them up. I am so angry and fed up with this problem. I feel that the responsible citizens have lost again.

There are approximately 30 adult computer stations at each of our library branches, and they are often placed next to the section for children’s books. My children and I visit the library frequently because we are homeschooling and need to use the library’s resources. One day, my 10-year-old daughter was searching the archives on the computer, and next to her sat a black transexual man, dressed in women’s clothing, viewing a gay porn video. I was a few feet away from her, and did not immediately see him sit next to her. The video was graphic and violent. I immediately reported this to the librarian, a black woman, and she ran to this man, pointed to me directly, and said that I had reported him and asked him to leave immediately. This put me in great danger, and I asked the security guard to walk me to my car that day. At the time, the library had no computer policy in place.

On one occasion, my son sat at a vacant computer station, and on the screen was a graphic e-mail which had been sent by a person who had been discussing a sexual encounter with another person. They had arranged a sexual “hook up” for 2:00 p.m. that day. My son, after reading the e-mail, came to me to report it. It appeared that this user did not properly log off from the station. The librarian made a screen shot of the e-mail, but told me that the person using the computer used a “guest pass” and could not be traced. She said that they had problems with “sex workers” using the library to conduct their business. One must not apply for an official library card in Indiana in order to use the free computers. Responsible patrons must show proof of residency and ID in order to obtain a library card, but the computer users get a free guest pass and remain anonymous.

On another occasion, I was standing at the printer station to print a document, and an older black male patron had printed photos of a bare-breasted stripper in a g-string on a stripper pole. The librarian, a 60-something white woman, was helping him print these photos, acting as if she did not see the images that were actually being printed. The man told her it was his mother. I laughed out loud at his comment. The librarian seemed flustered at the time. I reported this incident as well, and the librarian told me that as long as the person in the photo or video was wearing a “g-string” or “thong” and not showing the “pubic area” that the photos were allowed for viewing. She said that they could not prevent such images from being printed on library printers.

I talk openly about the differences between the computer patrons and the traditional library patrons. The local black underclass does not read books, and they are close to 100 percent of the free computer users. Many of these people are young and jobless, and the women allow their small children to run wild through the library while they are chatting online. They leave their small babies to cry in car seats on the floor and create a disturbance. I escorted a lonely toddler back into the library once because she was headed out into the parking lot. Her mother was oblivious to her whereabouts. While the nice, white, homeschooling mothers are dutifully helping their children learn and pick out educational books and videos for their children’s lessons, the young black underclass men are surfing porn in the afternoons, bopping their heads to loud rap videos, and talking trash on Twitter. There are clear signs which read “No Cellphones,” but the computer patrons chatter along in loud, profanity-laced cell phone conversations. The librarians are unable to enforce the rules because they are in fear of offending someone.

The library branch closest to me offers an online grocery shopping and delivery service to “poor” patrons and neighbors, a summer feeding program for neighborhood kids and parents, a “safe zone” hangout for single black teen mothers, and free help with taxes and legal issues. The library has become a hub for the coordination and delivery of social services programs for the underclass, while the rest of us must endure their atrocious behavior, assaults on our children, and the funding of a library that we can no longer use. Our city has spent millions of dollars renovating the historic downtown Central Library so that homeless men can wash their feet in the stainless-steel wash basins of the chrome and tile restrooms, sell drugs in the dark corners behind walls of books, eat fried chicken dinners on the upholstered furniture, leave their trash strewn about, and then safely and anonymously surf porn sites in the children’s computer section.

It is a shame, and I have talked with so many other people who have had the same experience. I sent a detailed complaint letter to the library CEO, and in reply, she scolded me, suggesting that I be more tolerant of “other” people. We must all live together in harmony, and the library will not “discriminate” against any of their patrons for the benefit of a few. I would like the option to not fund the library with my husband’s hard-earned money.

James N. writes:

The harm to the community from legalizing pornography for adults is severe and, in my opinion, unsustainable (there, I said it).

The offense against the little ones is much worse, of course.

But this is in a nation whose marquee sporting event last night [the Super Bowl] showcased at half time a degenerate whose breakthrough multiplatinum hit was “F**k you” and
Madonna singing her thinly disguised paen to fellatio “Like a Prayer,” along with a black woman who gave the crowd the finger and sang, “I don’t give a sh*t.” 

In this context, where tens of millions of parents have no objection to their children viewing this Super Filth, what really is going to be done about perverts in the library?

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