Skip to content

How to End a Military Career

 

WHEELER McPHERSON writes:

I enjoyed the post about Capt. Katie Petronio of the Marine Corps. While reading it, I was aware of one pervasive thought: this candid captain has signed her own career death warrant.

The Marine Corps has committed many doctrinal heresies in recent years (the homosexualization of the Corps, the feminization of the Corps, the zero-defect mentality, the “We-must-have-more- minority-officers-no-matter-what-we-have-to-do-to-get-them” mindset, etc.). The one thing the Marine Corps will not tolerate is public dissent from the officer corps. Sure, the Public Affairs Office will assure us that Captain Petronio has every right to express herself as a Marine and a citizen…but there’s that little matter of her being a company-grade officer. Until a Marine officer reaches field grade (major through colonel), career status is quite fragile. One bad fitness report will end a career. I’d wager that at this very minute, Captain Petronio’s commanding officer is mentally composing her next fitness report. Probably with some helpful input from HQMC.

Isn’t it interesting how military officers can now march – in uniform! – in so-called “gay pride” parades, but their criticism of asinine policies will see them cashiered? Watch and see. The skipper will be handed her papers and escorted to the door.

Laura writes:

Thank you for writing.

I assume that Capt. Petronio is well aware of these facts. That’s why she is to be credited with the bravery of a true soldier.

— Comments —-

Kevin writes:

Laura wrote:

“That’s why she is to be credited with the bravery of a true soldier.”

A true Marine. I once made the mistake of referring to Marines as soldiers, and a Marine with whom I was drinking at the Crown Plaza Hotel bar in Harrisburg, PA (two weeks after the 9/11 attacks), thanked me for the cocktail I bought him and said he would only this once overlook the insult of being associated with the U.S. Army.

He had met Chesty Puller once, so I figured he was serious.

They have a lot of self-control, but they hate being called soldiers.

Laura writes:

Correction noted. I have to say that personally I have a hard time calling a woman a Marine. It’s hard enough calling a woman a soldier, but to call her a Marine seems a more extreme oxymoron,  equally an offense against the Marines and an offense against womanhood. I think a man should challenge any man who calls his wife a Marine to a duel, or at least a fist fight. But then we all know that I am criminally old-fashioned.

I can accept Capt. Petronio’s argument that women serve a useful function in “engagement teams.” But I still think of that as, at best, a necessary evil that is a result of engaging in wars and so-called humanitarian projects in all the wrong places and for all the wrong reasons.

MarkyMark writes:

I admire the courage that Capt. Petronio has. However (sorry to be crude here), it’s a crying SHAME when women have more balls than guys do! I can’t recall a male officer in any branch of the service publicly saying the same things Capt. Petronio has.

 Hurricane Betsy writes:

“I can accept Capt. Petronio’s argument that women serve a useful function in “engagement teams.” But I still think of that as, at best, a necessary evil that is a result of engaging in wars and so-called humanitarian projects in all the wrong places and for all the wrong reasons.”

Male or female, all members of the armed forces have a legal and moral duty to refuse to be involved in wars and humanitarian projects that don’t serve their own country’s interests. All well and good to blame the snakes in government for these evil wars, but there is a reason that revolt, sedition and mutiny have always existed.

Share:EmailFacebook0Twitter1Pinterest0Google+0