The Thinking 
Housewife
 

Model Minority: Patriarchy Edition

August 1, 2017

S., a female Indian immigrant, writes:

Scene: Inside the subway on a hot day in New York, in a packed car with no air conditioning.

Participants: Me, average New Yorkers and a Chinese father and daughter pair seated opposite me. The girl is dressed in a skirt and blouse.

A white girl in her early 20s boards the car. She is dressed in a see-through white, cotton vest with a colored bikini under it and denim shorts. She proceeds to take off the vest and ties it around her waist, presumably because she is melting from the heat.

Chinese Father erupts in a low volume, jaw-grinding volley of Mandarin, pointing towards the white girl and then gesticulating a slapping motion, presumably implying that should his girl ever be in a state of undress in a packed subway he would spank her. Meanwhile the men are staring at the beautiful, educated young women, possibly a student in an elite institution, in her bikini.

Liberalism is doing away with your values while allowing minorities to stick to their own.

— Comments —

Albrecht writes:

Your Indian corespondent writes:

“Chinese Father erupts in a low volume, jaw-grinding volley of Mandarin, pointing towards the white girl and then gesticulating a slapping motion, presumably implying that should his girl ever be in a state of undress in a packed subway he would spank her. Meanwhile the men are staring at the beautiful, educated young women, possibly a student in an elite institution, in her bikini.

Liberalism is doing away with your values while allowing minorities to stick to their own.”

Our society has long since junked it’s “values” (i.e., moral standards) regarding decent dress and conduct in public. I’m pretty sure that prior to, say, 1960, (and for about 2,000 years before that) had group of Europeans – even a subway car full of New Yorkers – witnessed a woman stripping down to her bra in public their response would have been about the same as the Chinese guy’s, if differently expressed. One or two of them – most likely women – might have made tart and audible remarks about the young woman’s virtue. Today we call that “slut-shaming.” In other times and places the reaction would have been stronger than that.

Here’s another case where pressure to assimilate to our society’s (current, debased) “values” would be to promote evil. But, then, we don’t really have a society anymore, do we? More of a sewer.

Whatever you may think of Ann Barnhardt her point that “We are the gold” is apt. That is, it hardly matters what your monetary system is based on, whether gold or something else. If the people who use it are virtuous, their money will be sound. If they are morally corrupt their money will become worthless, too. There’s an old expression, “As sound as a dollar.” It dates back, perhaps not coincidentally, to the days when the Gibson girl was the standard of American womanhood. I won’t say that standard was beyond critique, just that it was a higher one than that which permits young savages to wander around in public in their underwear.

Laura writes:

You’re right, the dress of the girl in the subway would probably have been unacceptable to her own father if she were a few decades younger.

It does matter what the monetary system is, but that alone is not sufficient to make people virtuous.

A usury-based, privately-hijacked monetary system such as ours concentrates wealth at the top and drags people down, making it harder to be good. Systematized usury always brings about a breakdown in morals. Student loans, to take one example, have inflated college tuitions and reduced many young people to a form of prolonged indentured servitude, with heavy debts for many years. These debts make it much more difficult to form families. Inflation caused by systematized debt affects everyone, even those with no personal debt, and makes it harder for people to pursue a virtuous life. Technological advances have had a disproportionate effect on the less educated, making it hard to find jobs and be financially independent. That doesn’t mean technology is bad, but our monetary system should correct for these disparities, as advocated, for example, by “social credit” economics.

Ann Barnhardt is a Zionist shill.

I have no interest in what someone who believes in dropping nuclear bombs on Muslim countries has to say about virtue.

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