The Thinking 
Housewife
 

France

The Great Catastrophe in France

December 11, 2012

 

Muslims at prayer in Paris

TIBERGE at Galliawatch provides a translation of an article on mass immigration in France. From the piece:

Many Frenchmen of European origin feel like foreigners in their own country. In certain neighborhoods, they become an oppressed minority. Foreign customs – the Islamic veil, boubous, djellabas – are forced on them in public areas. Read More »

 

Galliawatch on Events in France

September 20, 2012

 

French Islamic poster ("Don't touch my prophet")

MUSLIM rioting on the Champs-Elysée, a glowing speech by a French bishop at the inauguration of a new mosque, the closure of a museum dedicated to Joan of Arc in Rouen and the new Islamic exhibit at the Louvre —- the blogger Tiberge at Galliawatch has these and other must-read posts about events in France.

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France’s First Girlfriend

May 16, 2012

 

FRANÇOIS HOLLANDE, the new president of France, is the first to occupy the Élysée Palace with a live-in companion instead of a wife. The political journalist Valérie Trierweiler is pictured above at yesterday’s swearing-in. (Tiberge of GalliaWatch writes about the event here.) Mrs. Trierweiler still covers politics for a television network. She is twice married and twice divorced.

She has three teenage sons, who are now in the uncomfortable position of having a mother in a public relationship with someone other than their father. Concern for that kind of thing, however, is passé in France, where the whims of adults reign freely over the lives of children. Selfishness and superficiality are terribly enlightened to the French, who redesign the family while their culture fades into the night.

Mrs. Trierweiler, an attractive woman with a quintessentially French face, told the New York Times: “I haven’t been raised to serve a husband. I built my entire life on the idea of independence.” As we can see from her outfit yesterday, this independence entails a certain degree of sexual aggression.

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